Special Education in Plain Language

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Individualized Education Program (IEP)

Transition

What The Law Says
  1. Beginning not later than in the first individualized education program that will be in effect when the child is 14, and updated annually thereafter, a statement of appropriate, measurable postsecondary goals for the child based on age-appropriate transition assessments related to training, education, employment and, where appropriate, independent living skills. 

  2. Beginning not later than in the first individualized education program that will be in effect when the child is 14, and updated annually thereafter, a description of the transition services, including courses of study, needed to assist the child in reaching the goals under subd. 1.  115.787(2)(g).


What The Law Means

Transition planning begins no later than the IEP that will be in place when the child turns 14.   Transition planning is part of the IEP every year after that.  The IEP team writes measurable goals for after high school.  The goals are based on age appropriate assessments of the child’s needs for training, education, employment, and independent living skills.

 

No later than age 14, the IEP describes transition services the child will need to reach the after high school goals.  Transition planning is part of the IEP every year until the child is out of school. 


What Needs To Be Done

Transition planning must include the child’s strengths, preferences and interests.  The school invites the pupil to participate in the meeting.  If the pupil does not come, the IEP team still must consider the child’s strengths, preferences, and interests.

 

The IEP team writes measurable postsecondary goals.  The pupil’s course of study, coordinated set of activities, and annual IEP goals should lead to the pupil’s measurable postsecondary goals.

 

The IEP team decides which classes and other activities will help the pupil reach the goals s/he would like to achieve after high school.  Transition services may include instruction, related services, community experiences, the development of employment and other post-school living objectives, acquiring daily living skills, and functional vocational evaluation.


What Parents Need to Know or Do

Transition is about preparing for life as an adult.  Parents and their child are very important in transition planning.  Parents, as well as their child, can contribute information to transition assessments.  Parents should talk with their child about their strengths, preferences, and interests.  Parents and youth can help the rest of the IEP team identify measurable goals that the pupil would like to achieve after high school.

 

Parents can encourage their child to come to the IEP team meeting and tell the rest of the IEP team what the child wants for life beyond high school, so classes and services can be selected.

 

TIP:  Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) provides job and employment services for adults with disabilities.  Call DVR to find out what it can offer young adults. Find your county DVR in the Resource Directory of the Wisconsin Statewide Transition Initiative (WSTI): http://www.wsti.org/resource_directory.php


TIP:  Refer to WSTI Project website at: http://www.wsti.org.